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Effectiveness of a novel virtual-reality based Interactive Binocular Treatment (I-BiT) system for the treatment of amblyopia

Lazy eye (amblyopia) is caused by the presence of a turn in one eye or a focusing error resulting in a blurred image. The brain then suppresses vision from the eye in question. Amblyopia is treated by wearing a patch on the good eye to force the use of the lazy eye: this is most effective in children up to age 8, after which it is considerably less effective, or ineffective. If any effect is to occur, the patch must be worn for hours each day and for many months. Children dislike the patch as they cannot see properly whilst wearing it; it stops them using both eyes simultaneously; and it stigmatises them. As an alternative to this treatment, we have developed a virtual-reality based system to treat amblyopia by children playing special video games and watching DVDs. This is an interactive binocular system for the treatment of amblyopia (I-BiT System). In previous pilot studies, this has been shown to be highly effective. However, we have not yet performed a placebo-controlled trial and we do not know which of the two features of our stimulus (DVD or playing interactive computer games) is the more effective. We wish to answer both these questions and also to use new video display technology (shutter glasses) that has been developed since we began these studies, to see if these are as effective as our prototype. 

Chief Investigator: Prof Alex Foss 

Number and location of participating sites (by region/ country): 2 Sites, UK only

EudraCT number: N/A

ISRCTN number/ Clinical Trials.gov Number: N/A  

Funder: The Wellcome Trust 

Sponsor: Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

Current Status: Published 

Derby CTSU Involvement: Study design, statistical analysis, manuscript preparation

Publication Link: http://bjo.bmj.com/content/100/11/1511

A prospective pilot single-centre study to explore the effectiveness of a Specialist in-patient Parkinson's Disease Unit (SPDU) for urgent Parkinson's admissions compared to usual care.

Suboptimal management of Parkinson's disease (PD) medication in hospital may lead to avoidable complications. An in-patient PD unit for those admitted urgently with general medical problems was defined following consultation with patients and professionals. A single centre prospective feasibility study was conducted to compare medication management, length of stay and patient experience before and after the introduction of an SPDU. 

Chief Investigator: Dr Rob Skelly 

Number and location of participating sites (by region/ country): 1 Site, UK only

EudraCT number: N/A

ISRCTN number/ Clinical Trials.gov Number: N/A  

Funder: Parkinson’s UK 

Sponsor: Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Current Status: Published 

Derby CTSU Involvement: Study design, trial management, monitoring, data management, database build, sample size estimations, statistical analysis, manuscript preparation

Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4228081/

The Renal Risk in Derby Study (RRID)

This is a long-term longitudinal observational cohort study. Defining the risk of renal function decline and cardiovascular disease among patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3: a prospective study to develop renal risk scores.  

Chief Investigator: Prof Maarten Taal 

Number and location of participating sites (by region/ country): 1 Site and GP practices within the Derby area, UK only

EudraCT number: N/A

ISRCTN number/ Clinical Trials.gov Number: N/A  

Funder: Roche Products Limited 

Sponsor: Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Current Status: Closed to recruitment in follow up 

Derby CTSU Involvement: Study design, sample size estimations, statistical analysis, manuscript preparation

Publication Link: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/2555/1/journal.pone.0055444.pdf